Guess This Picture
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Low cost neuterIt’s time for a game of Guess That Picture. I wish I could say this is all just a bad joke, but some things you just can’t make up.

This week a new client came to us and said that her 8 year old Chihuahua has had a lump that sometimes breaks open and drains blood where his neuter incision is. He was neutered at a low-cost spay/neuter clinic in Kentucky when he was a year old. It’s been draining like this off and on for 7 years(!).

However, just recently the area broke completely open and now she saw exactly what you’re looking at in this picture. Can you guess what it is? (More pictures below.)

When we neuter a dog – the technical name is orchiectomy – we remove both testicles. The testicles are removed through a single incision located just in front of the scrotum.

After the incision is made the testicles are exteriorized one at a time. The spermatic cords – the combination of testicular artery and vein and nerve, as well as the vas deferens – are tied off individually with absorbable suture. Supposedly. After each cord is tied off it is severed and the tied end retracts back up into the abdomen.

After the testicles are removed the subcutaneous tissue and then the skin are closed individually, again with absorbable suture. Some veterinary clinics use tissue adhesive to close the skin because it’s faster and a lot cheaper. However, we’ve found that neuters closed with tissue adhesive are up to five times as likely to come open in the first few days following surgery. So we use a much more modern absorbable suture that a.) almost never comes open after surgery, and b.) absorbs extremely rapidly for the pet’s comfort and owner’s peace of mind.

However, the doctor who did the surgery in this case apparently had his own way of doing things. The piece of plastic that you see in the picture is the culprit that made the skin over the surgery site continue to seep off and on. It is the plastic end connector of a plastic wire tie, otherwise known as a zip tie.

Apparently, this is what the surgeon used to tie off the spermatic cords in lieu of true suture. We can only guess that he used one zip tie on each side and then relied on them to retract firmly into the abdomen where, hopefully, they would remain inert. Who knows. I’ve never in my life heard of anything like this before, but it just goes to show no matter how long you practice, there’s always something new under the sun.

In this case we simply removed the wire tie and debrided and closed the skin routinely. The pet is doing great. On the other hand we’ll probably never know whether there’s another wire tie up in this dog’s abdomen somewhere. If there is, it apparently is not causing any problems. At least not yet.

It’s time for a game of Guess That Picture. I wish I could say this is all just a bad joke, but some things you just can’t make up.

This week a new client came to us and said that her 8 year old Chihuahua has had a lump that sometimes breaks open and drains blood where his neuter incision is. He was neutered at a low-cost spay/neuter clinic in Kentucky when he was a year old. It’s been draining like this off and on for 7 years(!).

However, just recently the area broke completely open and now she saw exactly what you’re looking at in this picture. Can you guess what it is? (More pictures below.)

When we neuter a dog – the technical name is orchiectomy – we remove both testicles. The testicles are removed through a single incision located just in front of the scrotum.

After the incision is made the testicles are exteriorized one at a time. The spermatic cords – the combination of testicular artery and vein and nerve, as well as the vas deferens – are tied off individually with absorbable suture. Supposedly. After each cord is tied off it is severed and the tied end retracts back up into the abdomen.

After the testicles are removed the subcutaneous tissue and then the skin are closed individually, again with absorbable suture. Some veterinary clinics use tissue adhesive to close the skin because it’s faster and a lot cheaper. However, we’ve found that neuters closed with tissue adhesive are up to five times as likely to come open in the first few days following surgery. So we use a much more modern absorbable suture that a.) almost never comes open after surgery, and b.) absorbs extremely rapidly for the pet’s comfort and owner’s peace of mind.

However, the doctor who did the surgery in this case apparently had his own way of doing things. The piece of plastic that you see in the picture is the culprit that made the skin over the surgery site continue to seep off and on. It is the plastic end connector of a plastic wire tie, otherwise known as a zip tie.

Apparently, this is what the surgeon used to tie off the spermatic cords in lieu of true suture. We can only guess that he used one zip tie on each side and then relied on them to retract firmly into the abdomen where, hopefully, they would remain inert. Who knows. I’ve never in my life heard of anything like this before, but it just goes to show no matter how long you practice, there’s always something new under the sun.

In this case we simply removed the wire tie and debrided and closed the skin routinely. The pet is doing great. On the other hand we’ll probably never know whether there’s another wire tie up in this dog’s abdomen somewhere. If there is, it apparently is not causing any problems. At least not yet.

It’s time for a game of Guess That Picture. I wish I could say this is all just a bad joke, but some things you just can’t make up.

This week a new client came to us and said that her 8 year old Chihuahua has had a lump that sometimes breaks open and drains blood where his neuter incision is. He was neutered at a low-cost spay/neuter clinic in Kentucky when he was a year old. It’s been draining like this off and on for 7 years(!).

However, just recently the area broke completely open and now she saw exactly what you’re looking at in this picture. Can you guess what it is? (More pictures below.)

When we neuter a dog – the technical name is orchiectomy – we remove both testicles. The testicles are removed through a single incision located just in front of the scrotum.

After the incision is made the testicles are exteriorized one at a time. The spermatic cords – the combination of testicular artery and vein and nerve, as well as the vas deferens – are tied off individually with absorbable suture. Supposedly. After each cord is tied off it is severed and the tied end retracts back up into the abdomen.

After the testicles are removed the subcutaneous tissue and then the skin are closed individually, again with absorbable suture. Some veterinary clinics use tissue adhesive to close the skin because it’s faster and a lot cheaper. However, we’ve found that neuters closed with tissue adhesive are up to five times as likely to come open in the first few days following surgery. So we use a much more modern absorbable suture that a.) almost never comes open after surgery, and b.) absorbs extremely rapidly for the pet’s comfort and owner’s peace of mind.

However, the doctor who did the surgery in this case apparently had his own way of doing things. The piece of plastic that you see in the picture is the culprit that made the skin over the surgery site continue to seep off and on. It is the plastic end connector of a plastic wire tie, otherwise known as a zip tie.

Apparently, this is what the surgeon used to tie off the spermatic cords in lieu of true suture. We can only guess that he used one zip tie on each side and then relied on them to retract firmly into the abdomen where, hopefully, they would remain inert. Who knows. I’ve never in my life heard of anything like this before, but it just goes to show no matter how long you practice, there’s always something new under the sun.

In this case we simply removed the wire tie and debrided and closed the skin routinely. The pet is doing great. On the other hand we’ll probably never know whether there’s another wire tie up in this dog’s abdomen somewhere. If there is, it apparently is not causing any problems. At least not yet.

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