Hip Dysplasia and Joint Issues in Dogs
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There are a number of ways to prevent and/or treat a dog or cat with hip, bone, and joint issues ranging from hip dysplasia to arthritis.   For the sake of time and effort, this article will focus on hip dysplasia, as it is the most common of all the hip, bone and joint issues.

Dog breeds that normally develop hip dysplasia are large to giant sized breeds. However, hip dysplasia can also appear in mixed breeds or crossbreeds that weigh over 30 pounds.

Hip dysplasia x-ray

Early, mild hip dysplasia in a Labrador Retriever.

It is one of the most common genetic conditions known in dogs. More than one gene is responsible for the deformity of the hip joints. Treatment can be expensive, often requiring corrective surgery. There is a fair degree of argument in the scientific journals regarding the causes of hip dysplasia, and whether it’s more of an environmental problem or a genetic issue. It has been our experience that genetics are the key driver of hip dysplasia in dogs. To the degree that environmental factors play a role they all can be lumped into the category of diet in the first year of life. We’ll broach that subject in depth in later articles.

Being a primarily genetic issue, it is important to remember that in most cases, the symptoms of hip dysplasia appear before the puppy is 13 months old, although in theory they can present when the dog is older. We very frequently encounter owners who bring in their large breed dogs who are 7 or more years old, and think the dog’s rear leg weakness is due to bad hips. Almost without exception, those dogs have other joint issues than hips. The most common joint issues in these older dogs are knee problems – such as torn anterior cruciate ligaments – or spinal issues, such as spondylosis.

Common Breeds

The most common breeds known to be prone to hip dysplasia include:

  • Labrador Retriever
  • Chesapeake Bay Retriever
  • Golden Retriever
  • Australian Shepherd
  • German Shepherd
  • American Staffordshire Terrier (or AmStaff)
  • Bullmastiff
  • Mastiff (taller than the bullmastiff)
  • Great Dane
  • Rottweiler
  • Standard Poodle
  • Giant Schnauzer
  • Akita
  • Chinese Shar-Pei
  • Chow Chow
  • Dogue de Bourdeax or French Mastiff
  • Newfoundland (Newfies)
  • Greater Swiss Mountain Dog
  • Bernese Mountain Dog
  • Kuvasz
  • American bulldog
  • Argentine Dogo (or Dogo Argentino)
  • Neapolitan Mastiff
  • Alaskan malamute
  • Samoyed
  • Briard
  • Puli (or Hungarian Puli)
  • Saint Bernard
  • Old English Sheepdog

Uncommon Breeds

These are basically dogs that are squarely built and have large appetites. If a dog is known to have one or more of these breeds in their ancestry, then it is important they are not allowed to get overweight.

A High Impact Naturopathic Remedy

Located below is a simple naturopathic remedy to treat hip dysplasia and other hip, bone, and joint related issues.  These ingredients and more are all included in our custom-formulated No Painful Dogs joint health supplement.

DO NOT FEED THESE INGREDIENTS TO A DOG OR CAT YOUNGER THAN TWO YEARS OLD, AS IT WILL INHIBIT THE NATURAL PRODUCTION OF BOTH GLUCOSAMINE AND CHONROITIN AT A VITAL STAGE OF THE ANIMAL’S LIFE.

  1. Glucosamine
  2. Green Lipped Mussel (Perna canaliculus)
  3. Chondroitin sulfate
  4. Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM)
  5. Omega 3 & 6 Fatty Acids

Other Naturopathic Remedies

Some of the other alternative, herbal, and naturopathic remedies that can help alleviate the signs and symptoms of hip dysplasia include the following. We’ll be discussing some of these in future posts:

  • Churchuhuasi
  • Turmeric
  • Devils Claw
  • Horsetail
  • Celery Seed
  • Dandelion,Yucca
  • Magnolia
  • Chamomile
  • Yellow Dock
  • Ginger
  • Coconut Oil
  • Lactoferrin
  • Acai Berry
  • Beta Glucan Supreme
  • Barley Sprouts
  • Spirulina
  • Colostru
  • Agaricus Blazei
  • Turkey Tail
  • Reishi

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